Customer service in Ghana is a privilege!

Ghana is widely regarded as one of the most peaceful and welcoming countries in Sub-Saharan Africa if not the world. This assertion is seen in ones’ daily dealings in the country, smiles everywhere even through pain and day to day hustle of the everyday Ghanaian. It is a general attitude that boils down to the […]

Ghana is widely regarded as one of the most peaceful and welcoming countries in Sub-Saharan Africa if not the world. This assertion is seen in ones’ daily dealings in the country, smiles everywhere even through pain and day to day hustle of the everyday Ghanaian. It is a general attitude that boils down to the very culture of the people, sense of togetherness, unitary celebrations of birth, marriage and even death.

Almost every Ghanaian can be regarded as a service oriented person due to the stern upbringing of being there for each other, as well as the sense of responsibility that is instilled in them at a very young age. This trait makes them go out of their way to give a helping hand for family, friends and even strangers.

This selfless trait, however, fails to manifest in the service industries in Ghana. Most businesses in Ghana today are more interested in profit than the customers who actually bring the money.

I have spent a lot of time in BanksRestaurantsPrivate businesses etc., and the trend doesn’t seem to change. If you are regarded highly, then you are well catered for and it is even better being a foreigner in most cases. Customer service is very bad in a country like Ghana, considering the fact that they are naturally warm and friendly people. There is  a huge gap somewhere between the social aspects and business life, because most workers fail to bring that joy of serving others when it actually matters.

There are however some wonderful exceptions, these examples actually make one feel what it would be like to be a customer in a country like Ghana. One Botel in Cape coast is a prime example of a good customer service, where you are treated like the service being offered even though you paid isn’t a privilege but the true value of what you paid for and the need to make you want to come back again.

The internet today brings a lot of value to businesses than before, and it cuts across all countries. Social media, a byproduct of the internet offers various ways business owners can reach out to customers, not only as a means of increasing their revenue but also learn about customer behaviors. Getting to know who your customer is, what they care about and how they want to be perceived and treated is key to every business in this internet era and beyond.

There is a huge need for customer service improvement in the country, but like every problem knowing what the cause(s) is, will aid in addressing the issue at hand.

  • Where did we get it all wrong?
  • Are workers underpaid?
  • Do these workers have the right motivation for the work they do?
  • Is there a policy that incentivize workers to want to do more?
  • Do we even need an extra motivation to do what earns us a living on a daily?

Let’s get talking! Share your thoughts, it may be the starting point for an open discussion on this issue.

Aduteye Tawiah, Tennison (www.makolapapa.com)

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